How much "technical skill" is enough for teachers? For students? #edtechex


#1

I don’ t need to know how the engine works in my car, so why should I know what TCP/IP is and how DNS works?

I know how to read and write, so why is coding being talked about so much?


#2

I don’t think a huge amount of technical know how is important to start. It’s the willingness to learn and adapt that is most important. When I started my tech job I knew how certain technology worked (basic computing and iPads). Beyond that, the IT side, was foreign to me. I’ve learned as I go along with the help of our network manager. Always learning is key for teachers and kids.


#3

I’m guilty of confusing “willingness to learn and adapt” with “I don’t know how to restart my computer”. I expect more of the former and less of the latter, and need to promote that.


#4

I’ve always looked at it as if I were teaching my non-technical parents how to do something. That way, I am prepared for the worst! :smile: I can always adjust from there. I agree with Jon, it’s the willingness to learn something new. Start with the simple stuff to build confidence, then progress in difficulty level. I always create step-by-step “How to” guides when I am working with my staff.

For students… show them once and they’ll pick right up on it 99% of the time.


#5

I’m taking a different angle here. I want the teachers in my school to know how to teach and know how to incorporate tech into what and how they teach. I don’t give a lick if they know what a network is or how it works. (Honesty Check: I don’t really understand how a network works. I mean, I know the basics, but when our IT guys start throwing out initials I get more confused than the cat on Peppy LePue.)

I think teachers need a basic understanding of how to use and troubleshoot the tech they use, and be willing to ask when more expertise is needed.


#6

I wonder where to draw the line. Is knowing what DNS is and does important?

Does anyone have a list of terms broken up by basic/proficient/master?


#7

A lot depends on your IT dept. I had a computer teacher (former colleague from former school) visit one day. She was salivating with envy with what I had at my disposal. She, on the other hand, claimed to spend hours under the computers messing with cables. I’m blessed to have good IT support so I don’t need to know much. If your IT sucks, you’d better learn and learn quickly.

Basic - me
Proficient - Jon
Master - you


#8

Without an understanding of DNS and how it works, one can’t understand how to secure themselves from man-in-the-middle attacks or how to realize how insecure public wifi actually is. That’s just one example off the top of my head.

It’s like watching a movie or tv show that gets the terminology wrong. TV shows wouldn’t get a pass on saying that Columbus fought the Vikings in the new world, but they do get a pass when they mess up tech terms. Why is that?


#9

DNS – From my high school cross country days – DID NOT START. Right?

They get a pass on tech terms because the general public cares that the tech works, not HOW it works. I confess I fall somewhat into this boat. And I wonder how to build up the self-esteem of the public wifi.


#10

My wife and I have the same debate, why can’t I remember where the colander goes when I empty the dishwasher? “Why can’t you remember how to save a file to a flashdrive?”

Ugh, I have the definition of colander taking up precious real estate in my brain!